Monday, June 29, 2009

Monday Musings - 4th of July Edition

No more unwanted retrospection. More musing. I'm back. Let's roll.


As you may know, the majority of celebrities died over the weekend. R.I.P. collectively.

------------

Are Democrats serious about this Cap and Trade nonsense? I'm increasingly unsure. For starters, the concept itself has already failed on the open market, and as a public venture (New Zealand). The bill itself would have no impact on global temperature, and is marketed as a symbolic effort which will motivate other countries to change. Do Dems really want to be saddled with this in 2010? I don't think so.

Then there is the curious matter of the house vote. The house narrowly passed the cap and trade bill before the bill had actually been written. This is (sorta) fine for an innocuous proclamation in favor of, say, establishing a monument to memorialize some Indian. But for a "landmark" climate change bill?

Then, immediately after the house vote, Harry Reid announced to ABC news that he didn't have the votes to overcome a filibuster in the Senate. That's not the kind of announcement you make when you really want a bill to pass. If the bill fails, congressional Democrats get the best of both worlds. They can placate their green base (which isn't exactly difficult) while holding Republicans accountable for hating the environment.

------------

Over at Shefzilla (the unofficial blog of the best restaurant in Minneapolis), I find a sterling rebuke of our mayor's bizarre, arbitrary war on bottled water. The highlight:

The World Wildlife Fund created a two-minute video recently that explains how a single latte requires 53 gallons (or 848 cups) of water to grow the beans and feed the cows that produce the milk to make the drink.


Perfect.

------------

Headline on CNN.com: "Airline policies juggle larger passengers."

Sounds downright exhausting.

------------

It was anniversary week at the Sawyer household, and so we ate. How did we eat? We ate as follows:

Heartland - We had our anniversary dinner at the celebrated St. Paul restaurant. This is as close to perfect as dining gets. The service was outstanding, the food (Heartland features a different menu each night based on whichever local ingredients are available) was exotic (veal and duck sausage) and comfortable (tomatoes and onions) at the same time. I can't recommend this place enough.

Tavern on France - We stopped for lunch on a lark after a day of paddle-boating on Centennial's man-made lake. Their specialty is build-your-own pizzas, burgers and salads. My burger was unspectacular. The toppings were fun (because I picked them), but the meat itself was flaccid and over cooked. Burgers should never get soggy. They can be messy, but never soggy. The service was very good, though, and the patio is nice. If you must go, stick with a salad.

Izzy's Ice Cream - The yin to Pumphouse's yang. Punchy, precise flavors and dense ice cream. You've probably been there already, so I'm late to the game, but I'm beginning to actually enjoy ice cream again.

Nala Pak - Hit the lunch buffet at the vegetarian Indian place of some repute. This was a business lunch (no wifey). The food was outstanding for a buffet, with several dishes a cut above. Highlights include the dosa (brought to your table) and this rice pudding-type deal that is out of this world.

------------

Worried about the damn potato bugs gettin' to my tomatillos, but you know how that is. Peas are swelterin' in this heat.

3 Comments:

Blogger Sarah said...

next presidential platform:
The War on Fat

At 5'2" and 190 lbs, I'm considered obese. So to determine obesity, is there a chair one would have to sit in before purchasing a plane ticket like standing next to the cartoon guy with a measuring stick at the amusement park? Will we have to reveal our BMIs for e-tickets?
If you shop for larger clothes, you tend to pay higher prices. I'm for charging a little extra for more room but now for another full-price ticket. (and I don't speak for myself.
I love how the article says you're either skinny or obese. There's apparently no "average" any more. Also, there was allusion to people being marked obese by the with of their shoulders but their butts. This would be a genetic factor and create all kinds of issues based on DNA.

God Bless America.

12:41 PM  
Blogger Kevin Sawyer said...

Yeah, I'm in the obese category, and have always been overweight. I'd have to lose another 65 lbs. to hit my "normal" weight.

Not interested. Every skinny person I know has major health issues.

That said, there are some pretty damn fat people. When I was super-morbidly obese, I could fit into an airline seat comfortably. If you can't fit in the seat, you should pay for another seat.

Frankly, if you weigh 350+, you shouldn't be flying. The stress alone could end you.

2:32 PM  
Blogger Sarah said...

True (I also have to get better about proofing my comments. That last one was terrible)

I've been in the situation where I've been squished between 2 larger people. Not fun; moreso when there are no window or aisle seats available to switch to.

That reminds me, I have to change my seat assignment for Friday's flight.

6:08 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home